Hey K-k-k-Katie

golddustmotherfucker:

YOU. GUYS.

Yes.

golddustmotherfucker:

YOU. GUYS.

Yes.


amandaonwriting:

Literary Periods with a Timeline
Source for Image

I LOVEEEE THIS.
I don’t know why, but I am obsessed with the evolution of literature through history. I love love love it. Last year when I taught English 11, I was able to work closely with the American History teacher to simultaneously track lit movements with their corresponding historical framework and oh my WORD I absolutely adored it.
Fast fact: If I could ever create an English elective to teach, it would—without question—be Modernist American Literature. Swoon <3

amandaonwriting:

Literary Periods with a Timeline

Source for Image

I LOVEEEE THIS.

I don’t know why, but I am obsessed with the evolution of literature through history. I love love love it. Last year when I taught English 11, I was able to work closely with the American History teacher to simultaneously track lit movements with their corresponding historical framework and oh my WORD I absolutely adored it.

Fast fact: If I could ever create an English elective to teach, it would—without question—be Modernist American Literature. Swoon <3


22/100: did it whew

22/100: did it whew


Things I am telling myself that I am not lying to myself about:

I will just lay in bed, bop around Tumblr, and drink some tea for likeeeeee only a half an hour and THEN I will do a bit of p90x.


21/100: a student brought me a cupcake today(?)! Cutie.

21/100: a student brought me a cupcake today(?)! Cutie.


Hi! I haven’t posted anything #education-related in forever. So here’s my favorite

The Great Gatsby acting assignment:

Students were divided into groups and each was charged with acting out a particular scene from chapter 5 or 6 of The Great Gatsby. I provided the characters and the beginning and ending points—they had to assign characters, create a script, plan props, and create a true-to-text backdrop. On top of that, they had to teach the class the significance of the scene—what did it mean? what were the important parts? did it symbolically or thematically add to the story? etc.

Their presentations were absolutely lovely. We don’t have a theater program at my school which is a complete shame because it was RIGHT up some of these guys’ allies. Scenes flowed one into the other, so it was a great holistic recap of the chapters, and it was a fabulous way to hit those speaking and listening standards that get difficult to squeeze in :)


la-la-la-lines:


Ernest Hemingway to F. Scott Fitzgerald: “Kiss My Ass”
Hemingway once sent F. Scott Fitzgerald a typescript of A Farewell to Arms. Fitzgerald sent back ten pages of edits and comments, signing off with “A beautiful book it is!”. You can see Hemingway’s first reaction above (signed EH).


Priceless. 

Perf.

la-la-la-lines:

Ernest Hemingway to F. Scott Fitzgerald: “Kiss My Ass”

Hemingway once sent F. Scott Fitzgerald a typescript of A Farewell to Arms. Fitzgerald sent back ten pages of edits and comments, signing off with “A beautiful book it is!”. You can see Hemingway’s first reaction above (signed EH).

Priceless. 

Perf.


20/100: my little brother :)

20/100: my little brother :)


19/100: Happiest birthday, The Great Gatsby :)

19/100: Happiest birthday, The Great Gatsby :)


I heard this on NPR on my way home from school today. I thought it was interesting so I thought I’d share! When the audio goes up, I absolutely recommend listening to it—especially student Mack Godbee’s testimony. So sweet, touching, heartbreaking, and familiar.